guesswork

guesswork

This piece is in the form of what I call a ‘splice’, that is, a media combination.  In this case, the sound track from the 1950’s American games show, ‘What’s my line’ (against which the poem is recorded) should be heard as a continuation of the text.  The question might be asked who the ‘unfunny’ jester is, with the host explaining why the panel must be blindfolded. We must use of our knowledge of recent events to unmask the actual person of the ‘jester’.

Whatsmyline
Could the ‘unfunny jester’ even have a ‘line’ on which to argue now?

‘What’s My Line?’
  Your host for a plethora
      of universes existent and
          quantumly conceived,
        Wally Bruner,*
      against all
    odds…
       ‘Get over it!’
           with running
        hair dye the
       unfunny
     jester
sang

7 february 2021

*The host for the show at this time was not, in fact, Wally Bruner (who was the host when I watched it during my childhood), but John Daly.  The guest in this episode was Salvador Dalí, and for that reason there is a very brief clip at the start of the programme which features a performance of a dadaist sound poem.  This particular episode was recorded in 1952. 

The background to the reading is the episode in which Dalí appears.

coromandel turning

coromandel turning

coromandel_turning
When one became the other…

climbing
upward into
misting rain,
a cutting
on the ridge,
islands,
cloud
on
sea,

. .  . .. .

a headland,
cloud,
an
island

june 2, 2020
coromandel

Copyright © 2021 Peter Le Baige. All Rights Reserved

The music is from No. 4: ‘From the Portland Hills’ of Douglas Lilburn’s ‘Five Bagatelles for Piano’, recorded here by Michael Houston

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